Archive | March 2018

Buyer Demand Still Outpacing the Supply of Homes for Sale | Matthew Stewart Real Estate Team | Top Producer | Roseville | Granite Bay | Rocklin | Lincoln | Folsom

The price of any item is determined by the supply of that item, as well as market demand. The National Association of REALTORS (NAR) surveys “over 50,000 real estate practitioners about their expectations for home sales, prices and market conditions” for their monthly REALTORS Confidence Index.

Their latest edition sheds some light on the relationship between Seller Traffic (supply) and Buyer Traffic (demand).

Buyer Demand
The map below was created after asking the question: “How would you rate buyer traffic in your area?”

Buyer traffic is high in California. Inventory (homes for sale) is down which is putting pressure on the market causing pricing to increase. Sellers should be careful and not over price which will cause them to take longer to sell and generally sell for less money as they adjust price after the largest wave of interest the first 3-4 weeks. Matthew Stewart Real Estate Team | Roseville | Granite Bay | Rocklin | Lincoln | Folsom

The darker the blue, the stronger the demand for homes in that area. Only four states had a ‘stable’ demand level.

Seller Supply
The index also asked: “How would you rate seller traffic in your area?”

As you can see from the map below, 25 states reported ‘weak’ seller traffic, 21 states reported ‘stable’ seller traffic, 3 states and Washington D.C. reported ‘strong’ seller traffic, and only 1 state reported ‘very strong’ seller traffic. This means there are far fewer homes on the market than what is needed to satisfy the buyers who are out looking for their dream homes.

25 states reported weak seller traffic. Buyer demand is stronger than listing inventory which is causing prices to increase. Matthew Stewart Real Estate Team | Granite Bay | Roseville | Rocklin | Lincoln | Folsom | Sacramento

Bottom Line
Looking at the maps above, it is not hard to see why prices are appreciating in many areas of the country. Until the supply of homes for sale starts to meet buyer demand, prices will continue to increase. If you are debating listing your home for sale, meet with a local real estate professional in your area who can help you capitalize on the demand in the market now!

 

Matthew Stewart Real Estate Team gathered this information from “Keeping Current Matters”

https://www.matthewstewartrealestate.com/about-me

(916) 718-2979

matthewstewartrealestate@gmail.com

20 Quick Tips From People Who Are Winning With Money!!!

My beautiful wife and I recently completed Financial Peace University at our church – Bridgeway Christian in Roseville.  It was a wonderful experience that actually brought our entire marriage closer together.  Yes, we had argued about money prior to the course, and even more during the 9 week course, but it was revealing things that otherwise would not have been exposed on our own.  It forced us to verbalize our views and goals about money.  Now we have a unified goal and are moving together in the same direction.  I highly recommend the class.  It impacted us so positively that we are looking to be co-leaders for the next 9 week class in the Fall.  Come join us!  I receive Dave’s newsletter and thought I would pass along this article.

Financial Peace University really does work and you can join my wife and me at Bridgeway Church for the start of another 9 week schedule.  *No, this is not a picture of us! 😉

Do you ever get frustrated trying to figure out how much to tip?

Next time you’re out to eat and not sure how much to tip your waiter, try this: Double the tax. Depending on where you live, this number will be 12–20% of your total bill. Then you can increase as needed. So easy!

We can all benefit from a few quick money tips, so we asked people who’ve gone through Financial Peace University (FPU)—Dave Ramsey’s most popular nine-week class about money management—to share the most valuable lesson they learned.

Here’s what they had to say:

1. Keep your savings account at a different bank than your checking account.
“That way you don’t see your savings every time you log into your account. You won’t be tempted to transfer it or use it. Out of sight, out of mind!” — Michelle M.

2. Use the budget to help you reach fun goals.
A budget isn’t something you have to do because you’ve been bad. It’s something you do so you can be good. We’re going to Disney and paying cash!” — Alex S.

3. Only buy what you need (and can afford).
“Even though something is a good deal, it doesn’t mean you should buy it.” — Anne M.

4. What matters isn’t how much you’re allowed to borrow but how much you have in the bank.
“Who cares about my FICO score? I don’t.” — Hyunmee P.

5. Don’t let discouragement keep you from making a budget.
“There’s always hope when you have a plan.” — Brandon C.

6. Go old school and balance your checking account.
“This is essential! Balance your checking account so you know where you’re at and then begin with a basic budget. It’s all about taking baby steps.” — Kay N.

7. Give yourself some fun money so you’ll stay on budget.
“I was swiping my card for miscellaneous things. It turns out we were blowing the budget by $150 to $250 a month! I just needed to issue myself an envelope system for pocket money. Now I even have money left over at the end of the month!” — Rick M.

8. Say goodbye to all of your debt.
“I grew up with the misconception that having car loans, a house loan and student loans was something everybody did when they got older. I don’t consider myself debt-free simply because I don’t have any credit card debt. My husband and I are working at paying off all of our debt!” — Amy M.

9. Be patient with purchases—and with yourself.
“We learned to be patient while saving up cash to purchase a new appliance, go on vacation, or buy a car. We also spent over 20 years learning that debt was good, so it took some time to unlearn these things and replace them with new behaviors.” — Katherine E.

10. Get on the same team with your spouse.
“Sitting down together and going over the bills and budget has changed our marriage. There are no more fights about money. We budget together.” — Trina G.

11. Set up a savings fund for irregular expenses.
“My son had just started preschool when I took FPU, so we were in and out of the doctor’s office every week. I now set aside a few dollars in my budget each week for copay and prescription costs. This is a godsend!” — Sandy C.

12. Don’t believe everything society tells you about money.
“Debt can steal your future. It’s so important for kids to understand how to deal with money and debt—and what the consequences of their decisions will look like. You can make better decisions when you know all the facts.” — Susan K.

13. Be prepared for emergencies.
“Having an emergency fund for a rainy day will prevent you from getting a credit card and falling into debt.” — Hyunmee P.

14. Tell your money where to go.
“We learned the importance of a budget and telling our money where to go. It works! We’re now debt-free—that $89,000 owed is gone!” — Angelica A.

15. Put your long-term goals in the right order.
“Retirement should come before saving for my child’s college. I didn’t really think that through before taking the FPU class.” — Shawn H.

16. Use the envelope system.
“Pull money out of your account and put it in envelopes. If it isn’t in your envelope, you can’t use your debit card. We found when we stopped using envelopes for a month we busted our budget. Back to envelopes it is!” — Jennifer B.

17. Talk with your lender to solve any problems while you’re paying off debt.
“Always work with your credit card companies. My bank overcharged me interest, and after we talked, they ended up sending me a check.” — John S.

18. Embrace the power of cash.
“I bought several cars with cash and saved on the purchase price. Also, letting go of cash in hand hurts. I’ve walked away from many purchases in order to keep the cash in my hand.” — Desiree E.

19. Be generous.
“The most important lesson I learned in FPU was to set myself up to be a blessing to others—whether it’s by giving sound financial advice, helping people draft a monthly budget, or giving to someone anonymously.” — Alexander H.

20. Make daily decisions with the end goal in mind.
“The daily choices you make concerning your money dictate what options you will have. Sacrifice in the beginning reaps huge rewards in the end.” — Shelle C.

 

Matthew Stewart has been a full time real estate agent in the Greater Sacramento Area for over 18 years and has SOLD hundreds of homes.  If you have real estate questions or desire his expertise either as a seller or buyer, contact Matthew Stewart Real Estate Team

(916) 718-2979

http://www.matthewstewartrealestate.com

Are Home Values Really Overinflated?

As a professional it is our duty to KNOW the market and where it is trending so that proper decision making can be made by our clients.

Last week, the National Association of Realtors (NAR) released their most recent Existing Home Sales Report.According to the report:

“The median existing-home price for all housing types in January was $240,500, up 5.8 percent from January 2017 ($227,300). January’s price increase marks the 71st straight month of year-over-year gains.”

Seventy-one consecutive months of price increases may have some concerned that current home values may be overinflated.

However, at the same time, Zillow issued a press release which revealed:

“If the housing bubble and bust had not happened, and home values had instead appreciated at a steady pace, the median home value would be higher than its current value.”

Here are two graphs that help show why home prices are exactly where they should be.

The first graph shows actual median home sales prices from 2000 through 2017.

Are Home Values Really Overinflated? | Keeping Current Matters

By itself, this graph could heighten concerns as it shows home values rose in the early 2000s, came tumbling down and are now headed up again. It gives the feel of a rollercoaster ride that is about to take another turn downward.

However, if we also include where prices would naturally be, had there not been a boom & bust, we see a different story.

Are Home Values Really Overinflated? | Keeping Current Matters

The blue bars on this graph represent where prices would be if they had increased by the normal annual appreciation rate (3.6%). By adding 3.6% to the actual 2000 price and repeating that for each subsequent year, we can see that prices were overvalued during the boom, undervalued during the bust, and a little bit LOWER than where they should be right now.

Bottom Line

Based on historic appreciation levels, we should be very comfortable that current home values are not overinflated.

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